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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
, some are now drawing comparisons between this superstorm and katrina. so just how do they measure up? cnn meteorologist severe weather expert chad myers is taking a closer look. he's joining us now. how do they measure up, chad? >> well, first of all, the storm surge with katrina was enormous. almost three times more of a wave or of a surge with katrina as bay st. louis was about 28 feet. manhattan island, downtown, the battery, had about 9.5 feet. haven't seen too many numbers higher than that. 9.5 feet moving into the city comparing to moving into the bay, obviously there's a town there and all the way do biloxi, it's the population density in new york city that is going to -- and in new jersey and connecticut, that is going to put this way up in the record books. katrina, $145 billion in damage. andrew, this is cost for adjusted inflation $43.5 billion. and looks like somewhere sandy will fall somewhere between katrina and into andrew. so probably number two on the scale for dollar damage. now, when it comes to deaths, it's disturbing, wolf, to see and hear how quickly the fatalit
their lives. >> you remember this back with katrina, the same thing happened where a lot of residents in new orleans had seen a lot of hurricanes before. and they heard this is going to be the storm of century, and nothing ever happened to their houses, and they ignored evacuation orders. you can't -- there's only so much preparation you can do. you can never create a risk-free society. you can't prepare for everything. you know, but one of the things that has to happen in these situations for things to work right is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the perso
reinforce or under d undermine that narrative. in the case of george w. bush in 2006 with hurricane katrina, he campaigned as basically a compassionate conservative. but his actions during the whole katrina mess proved that he was otherwise. >> because you have that lasting image of president bush and when he said that thing about his fema director, way to go, brownie, or whatever he said. that sticks in people's minds to this day. >> right. that would be a defining sound bite of his entire presidency. granted, it's unfair, but that's what sticks in people's minds. >> in your mind, has president obama made the right move, wrong move? what do you think? >> i think he has made the appropriate move here. he hasn't been too over. that's the key here. you can't be overtly political in how you respond to these kinds of disasters. he obviously will accrue some benefits because he's acting aas commanders in chief are supposed to act and help people on a broad basis. as the remarks of governor christie of new jersey proved, this is a -- he gets bipartisan support out of this disaster. that has to he
what is going on. and the first thing we noticed was how much it felt like katrina. but it was much different in casualties with katrina, but then looking in the windows, and seeing men, women and children waving at us. most of them were smiling. the reason most of them are smiling is because the water has gone down a bit. the feeling is that it will continue to go down and they will be perhaps to start walking out of their houses tomorrow. it's not guaranteed yet. we saw scores of people waving at us, waiting to get out of their homes. we saw people trying to leave on their own. they seemed confused. a few people were driving through the water and so the cars got stuck and they could not push them. a police officer got out and went to rescue the people. took the woman on his shoulder and brought her to the shovel we were sitting in and the mayor and i helped to pull the woman in and the two other people in, that's the situation. it's incredible. right now, there are people in the dark and cold, waiting to be able to come out of their homes safely. >> it's amazing as you tell it. ga
sense as well? >> katrina? yes. i know how those people in katrina feel. i really do. my heart went out to them. but until you go through something like this, you cannot understand the magnitude of this. my friends have come to help me. they said, michelle, we looked at your yard because we have all the stuff in the yard. they said, michelle, if we didn't see this with our own eyes, we would never believe it. >> and it's hard to know when power will be restored. mayor bloomberg said the ferry service will resume in the next day or so. he says full service by saturday, the ferry from staten island over to manhattan, new york. but who knows what's going to happen. >> i don't know. >> our heart goes out to you and your family. >> thank you so much. i'm a big fan of yours, wolf. it's a pleasure to speak with you. you know, i have to put it in perspective. we have our lives and i have my children. and, you know, it's just stuff like my kids say. but when i find my son's baby book, it rips at your heart strings. but i'm grateful that we're here. >> yeah. and i like your attitude. you got to t
in new orleans right after hurricane katrina. he didn't want to get in the way of some of the cleanup. of course that disaster response didn't go as well as it looks like president obama is handling the response happening this time. but there is the danger dealing with secret service logistics at a time when regular logistics, just living every day life, becomes incredibly hard. >> i think it's worth pointing out certainly the obama campaign probably didn't imagine the extent. warmth of the words that chris christie has for the president, but mitt romney held his disaster relief event in ohio yesterday. the question that dogged him that he would not answer was about fema. take a listen. >> governor, what should fema's role be? governor, would you eliminate fema if you were president? >> well, it's either 11 or 14 times, depending on whose count you believe. the campaign released a statement saying that romney would not abolish fema but, quote, governor romney believes that states should be in charge of emergency management in responding to storms and other natural disasters in their j
, in hurricane katrina in 2005, the team of the nypd used a helicopter to lift people who were stranded in their homes by flood water. down on staten island three people now are missing. we know that 14 people have lost their lives on staten island alone at least 54 across the area so far. as we are seeing at ground level and especially from the air, perhaps the worst physical destruction is along the jersey shore. no doubt about that. today as you saw at the top of the broadcast, president obama and new jersey governor chris christie. >> crisis makes unexpected bed fellows. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his concern and compassion for the people of our state. >> president obama returned the fair. favor. >> he has put his heart and soul in making sure that the people of new jersey bounce back better than before. >> obama and christie touring a shelter for residents who lost everything. >>. [ inaudible ] >> fema will be coordinating. >> and walking a neighborhood among the hardest hit. >> among the surprises a president not known for displaying affection showed it this day. >
for president bush was of him hugging someone after a natural disaster. you know, the images of katrina, biggest single thing beyond the war in iraq that undermined confidence in president bush's leadership. you cannot get those images out of your head as you watch this stuff. >> except, you know what, katty kay? there is a certain appeal that i think is coming as a relief to people who are tired, who are tired of the vitriol, of the stupidity. and a politician who can work with the other side, isn't that something that in this new age of politics that's appealing? >> it's huge. and i think it's probably almost the overriding priority of whoever gets elected next tuesday is to be able to make this country governable again. and to be able to do that by bringing about a certain amount of cooperation on the things america needs to do between republicans and democrats. we saw it yesterday between chris christie and brearack oba. and it's going to be very interesting to watch today as the campaign trail resumes, whether there's a different tone. i wouldn't be surprised -- we've heard the president us
and the right thing to do. >> i agree. >> listen, whether you're trying to survive a katrina or a sandy, it doesn't matter if a person has a "d" or an "r" in front of their name. >> absolutely. >> thanks, guys, appreciate it. >> stay warm vicariously through me, my friend. >> all right. the new york marathon cancelled because of sandy. but my next guess is she's still going to run in memory of her mother, when we come back. [ male announcer ] do you have the legal protection you need? at legalzoom, we've created a better place to turn for your legal matters. maybe you want to incorporate a business you'd like to start. or protect your family with a will or living trust. legalzoom makes it easy with step-by-step help when completing your personalized document -- or you can even access an attorney to guide you along. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now yo
from and they're doing that with huge pumps. some of them deployed after katrina. they're pumping right now i think 700,000 gallons an hour. they hope later by later today they'll be pumping some 2 million gallons an hour. they're attacking this right now. at the same time, they try to push the debris out of their city. >> any idea, jim, how long that will take, that process of pumping it out? >> no. i don't really know how long it will take. because, you know, they're going to pump basements out. there's a high school near here. pumping that basement out. their gymnasium and back in to it so all the water's going to come out of the homes in to those lakes even as those lakes are being emptied and going to empty them all the way down to the bottom. it's certainly going to be a process. a weeklong process but at the same time the long-term outlook is here to rebuild and rebuild by memorial day, before the beginning of summer 2013. and they know that's even a tall order. may seem like seven months away, eight months away, no, there's so much work to be done in rebuilding it takes every bi
you compare this to other events you've seen? >> let's see. katrina -- or irene last year this area also flooded. but not nearly as bad as this. the clean up, it's pretty much drained within a day or so. and lost no electricity last year. this one we were -- you know, we don't know the epa. >> reporter: dan, thanks very much. good luck to you. wolf, there's one resident, one business owner here determine today recover. others here have an amazing sense of community spirit. these are all community volunteers doing all this work largely responsible for the clearing of the streets. as i mentioned, just a couple hours ago this water was up to my knees, up to the knees of these volunteers who waded out here in some very, very unhealthy and almost dangerous water because it has so much sewage and chemicals and garbage in it. >> brian, we'll get back to you in hoboken, new jersey. let's head back to manhattan. we've re-established our contact with dr. sanjay gupta. he's at bellevue hospital, sanjay, 700 patients now need to be evacuated because they've lost power, emergency generators at b
thing about what you said about the national feeling here. when katrina happened, i got a call the day after from haley barbour, the republican governor from mississippi, who of course, is a friend of mine. and he said, i need guardsmen. can you send me guardsmen? pennsylvania had, you know, nickel on that dime. we're thousands, hundreds of miles away from the gulf, but we have 20,000 guardsmen and i activated 2,100 and sent them down to mississippi and louisiana. and the interesting thing is, i got tons of letters from citizens of those states thanking me, but i also got letters from my own guardsmen, who said it was the best thing they've done since they've been in the national guard, to help americans from another area of the country, who are suffering. and that's the spirit that takes over and it's, as you said, what makes us a special place. >> well, that's why people like you and they like haley barbour, thank you, governor rendell, and thank you, david corn. you don't get to be a governor, you don't know what that's like. and for the latest on the devastation on the jersey shore
play a positive role in our lives. one of the reasons katrina was such a big scandal is for years, particularly under clinton, who really did a good job of reforming fema. we said, yeah, this is one of the things the federal government does well. and when states get into trouble like this, yes, they can do things for themselves and they do a lot of stuff for themselves. but they've got to have the fed. i think right now, he has no choice but to say, well, whatever i said before, i'm going to keep fema. >> e.j. dionne, are we going to be lacking on this campaign, if romney loses, saying, it was the 47% tsunami. that it really was that that set the table for a lot of other problems that he just couldn't overcome throughout this campaign? >> well, i think that the -- whatever momentum romney had from the first debate stopped. and my reading of the polls is the last week had already been going at least slightly in obama's direction. and at least on the first couple of days, from the reaction to what the president did, from the difficulties romney has, this appears to be helping obama
hurricane katrina, and he said new york city is a much more complex problem, because these tunnels are so deep and they are so long, and the path tunnel may be even a little bit luckier if you will, than the subway tunnels, because the subway tunnels, a system that just had its 108th birthday on saturday. one day before hurricane sandy hit, and some of the electrical equipment in these tunnels are so old, they don't know what the effect of saltwater eroding the tunnels. one of the things that struck me, governor cuomo, talking quite strongly yesterday and today about climate change and how climate change has made lower manhattan much more vulnerable to storm surges and made the subway system vulnerable, which is, unfortunately, something that was predicted and predictable. >> well, it's also something -- i was talking to a climate change expert today. it is only going to get worse. we've seen the water rise a foot over the last 100 years, but in the next 100 years, it will rise another two to three feet. for an island like manhattan, that's something we have to contend with. andrea, thank
of the indelible images of government failure after katrina. that's what people are reminded of. that's when you had a president and a federal government that did not work, did not come to the aid of people. so you don't have to talk about the bush legacy. you don't have to draw the comparison because it's right there in people's heads. in the case of our dear friend on radio, what's left of his head is xleerly exploding. >> ideologue is the kindest thing said about rush limbaugh on my show. richard wolffe always keeps it classy. richard wolff sxechlt chryst'll ball, thank you both very much for joining us tonight. coming up, mitt romney actually tells the crowd in ohio that he knows all about hurricane cleanup because, this is absolutely true, this is what he told them, he once had to help clean up the football field after a football game when he was in high school. seriously. that's his experience with cleanup. and that's in the "rewrite." and with the election just six days away, will voters across the northeast be able to actually vote on election day? will the hurricane problem still be goi
about this. we covered katrina so much, and we covered all the horror stories of the patients there. how the generators failed or why is something to look at in days ahead. but for everybody who worked there, as a resident of the city, i want to say thank you. >> you're welcome. it was the whole team. you have to remember that 19 babies that people took one at a time. >> each had that team. incredible. thank you so much. >> you're welcome. >> thank you so much. yeah. makes your heart feel good. another critical story is in its final days from now until tuesday. president obama, mitt romney plan to campaign nonstop in battleground states. today the romney campaign added a new one to the list. is that a siphon confidence or is it a bluff? we'll talk about that. what if there was a new way to deal with money that focused less on fees and more... on what matters? maybe your bank account is taking too much time and maybe it's costing too much money. introducing bluebird by american express and walmart. your alternative to checking and debit. it's loaded with features, not fees. because we thi
extraordinary stories of strangers helping strangers. we have seen that. we saw it in katrina, in haiti, and here as well. we just met a young woman, may y beth, a graduate student of the college of staten island, who took it upon herself to see that the hungry in this area were fed. she and some friends cooked up food and set up a distribution center right on the street. no one asked them to do it. they just stepped up to help. mary beth, who is blind, has her guide dog with her, we talked a short time ago. what made you come out here? >> today, one of my classmates, her name is jennifer, she reached out for help and told us that there was no services, they had no power, they were hungry, they were cold. so i cooked up some food, i brought it down, i reached out to my classmates. they brought down food so between myself, ruth, george, debbie, we brought down food and then all of a sudden, we became command central and the national guard, the fdny had dropped off everything. >> you've become like a command central here. >> we became command central. what we did is i went to my classes,
, reminds me of the hospital stories we heard in katrina and new orleans there must have been patients on ventilators that had to be manually kept alive and getting babies out of the nicu in the dead of night, when the power has gone out. i can't imagine how difficult that was. >> it reminded me very much of my time in new orleans after katrina. the adults, it was interesting, the adults on respirators, they batteries. they were brought down, some of them 15 flights of stairs on respirators with batteries. for some reason the neonatal -- the little newborn babies, their respirators did not have babies. doctors or nurses had to do bagging, where the doctors, the nurse squeezes air right into the baby's lungs so they're walking nine flights down from the nicu, while the whole time squeezing air into the babies' lungs. >> as far as you know, no fatalities. >> as far as we know, all is doing well. some people right now, anderson are asking the question, why didn't they evacuate sooner. i think that's a question that is going to be talked about at nyu for a while now. >> yeah. certainly the
from the aid given to the victims of hurricane katrina. >> gucci bags and massage parlors and everything you can think of. >> we will hear more from iowa congressman steve king straight ahead. >>> likely target, school's former president, why he could be charged with perjury. >>> plus this -- >> when negative ads and robo calls quit working, the political campaigns show up on doorsteps in ohio. what's it like to be a door-to-door campaign volunteer? newsroom starts now. >>> good morning. thank you so much for joining us. i'm carol costello. new death toll and deepening concern from hurricane sandy three days after the storm washed ashore. here is a time lapsed video. that's what you're look iing at right now. watch the right side of your screen as the new york city skyline is plunged into darkness. there it goes. today, nearly 5 million homes and businesses are still without power. the death toll is inching up again. superstorm blamed for 56 deaths in the united states. half the victims just in new york city. the mayor says he expects that number to rise. officials say it
people off the roofs of their homes, very reminiscent of what we saw with hurricane katrina. we have to take a short break. when we come back in just a moment, we'll continue to update you on the breaking stories we're following in the wake of this severe storm and tell you where sandy is headed next and assessing the damage left in her wake. back right after this. [ female announcer ] a classic meatloaf recipe from stouffer's starts with ground beef, unions, and peppers baked in a ketchup glaze with savory gravy and mashed russet potatoes. what makes stouffer's meatloaf best of all? that moment you enjoy it at home. stouffer's. let's fix dinner. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi® card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts. more events. more experiences. [ jack ] hey, who's boring now? [ male announcer ] get more access with a citi card. [ crowd c
't iraq. it wasn't wmds. it wasn't the horror of all of that. it was katrina and being caught sleeping and feeling like they had abandoned people in new orleans. it impacted them in a deeply personal way. these -- obviously people's lives are on the line here, too, but it also -- it's a sign of leadership. >> there is no pollster in the world who can get at the feelings, the emotions, of someone, a family, who has lost power for three or four days. what does that do to this election? that kind of emotional wild card. there's no way of telling what people feel or who they get angry at. >> one thing the president benefits from, i think, because again, i don't think the white house is going to mess this up. i bet you $10,000, they've got in the tri-state area, three extraordinarily aggressive governors, two democrats, one republican. but chris christie -- >> good way of putting it. >> cuomo and malloy is going to be very aggressive and work very close with the president and the white house because they are concerned about the people, not just the politics of it, they're concerned about th
been through with katrina and rita down on the gulf, you have to know that government has a purpose. i have always said that. it can be constructive. it's an umbrella on a rainy day to take the story at hand with sandy's enormous storm. but governor romney does not want to support government in the way that helps people. and that means eliminating medicare. it means not caring about seniors, not providing for pell grants. you can't flip-flop in the last hours to suggest you would embrace government. we all want government to be efficient, and president obama has been a leader. he has the smallest federal government we have had in decades under president obama. smallest number of employees, but it has been efficient enough to be effective on the east coast, rising to the occasion, to the extent that republican governors have given the president and his team compliments in their responsiveness and the mayor of new york has endorsed him. it's not about that. it's about the president wanting to support a constructive government and governor romney who is trying to be president, running aga
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)